BMC air filter

Discussion in 'Technical Forum' started by dj_spoolin, Jul 28, 2009.

  1. dj_spoolin

    dj_spoolin Member

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    I just bought a BMC race air filter for my 06 R6, it came with the filter and a restrictor or a cone that you install with the filter. My question is I was told that if im just using the bike for track just install the filter but if i'm going to use it for the streets use both. I'm thinking of using the bike mostly on the track and once in awhile in the streets. Does it matter if I install both parts? does this make sense?
     
  2. Juan42

    Juan42 Active Member

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    I was curious about your question, so I looked on the BMC site...and I'm still not sure I fully understand why they include a restrictor with their filter.
    If BMC says use the filter only for track, then that's what I'd do, regardless of track or street use. The only think I can see the restrictor doing for street use is cutting down on air intake noise...other than that I can't see any benefit, just a drawback of a bit more pressure drop on the air side.
     
  3. dj_spoolin

    dj_spoolin Member

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    That's what I was wondering too, I think I'll just install both for now and later on try it just with the filter on the track. Has anyone here used the BMC filter? How are doing Juan? how is your back doing? this is Allan by the way.
     
  4. Juan42

    Juan42 Active Member

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    Hi Allan,I'm feeling pretty good now...I'll definitely be ready for Round 5.
    I've got a K&N on my 03R6, it doesn't have any kind of restrictor cone on it. I think the BMC is a pretty similar concept though isn't it...oil wetted cotton gauze over a supporting wire screen?
    Juan
     
  5. dj_spoolin

    dj_spoolin Member

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    That's goog your back to normal, I'll definitely be there again as a spectator for the next race. I think there pretty similar K&N and BMC. I managed to find this info. I'm going on to the next Vicious Cycle track day and I think I'll just install the filter itself, I think I won't be able to notice any gains anyways till I purchase a complete muffler and a PC3 and get it dialed in.

    Question: For my motor bike, what’s the difference between NORMAL and RACE?

    Answer: For some motors, the BMC catalogue (viewable on the Web site) can offer customers 2 air filters for a single motor bike model: one called STANDARD and the other RACE.STANDARD filter: All BMC motor bike filters replace the original air filter (usually paper); that is they fit the series filter shape exactly and are installed in the air box with no need for any modification; but their characteristic and substantial difference is that the “filtering package” is different to the stock one, better performing. This means it lets more air through; the simple, effective process is that by letting more air through combustion improves, so engine power does too.
    RACE filter: The difference between standard and race lies in the “filtering package”, making the air passage to engine concept even more extreme: the RACE filter has an even greater air breathing capacity compared to the standard one and its installation is only, exclusively advised for motorbikes used on a race track as carburetion or injection could be weak (for carburetion the air quantity present in the mixture is greater than the quantity considered necessary, while for injection, despite the modern gearcase capacity to adapt itself within certain ranges, at times the excessive air increase is not handled correctly by the gearcase itself).
    To avoid problems of this kind and recover the right stoichiometric air/petrol relations, you need to increase petrol capacity. To do this, you normally use a gearcase, remapped or replacing the original. Otherwise for carburetion motor bikes you can have additional carburetion kits.
    RACE filters have the words “RACE” on their recognition code (e.g. FM 482/08 RACE) and a yellow line inside the filtering package making them easily recognisable.
     
  6. Planepower

    Planepower Active Member

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    Heiko
    I dont think youre going to notice much gain, if anything. Without proper jetting (get IVAN"s) you'll be running pretty lean, and that in itself could lead to engine problems later on.

    To get the best performance its adviseable to get the bike dyno tuned which includes exhaust gas analyzing.
     
  7. jetfixer15

    jetfixer15 Active Member

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    Real Name:
    Aaron Cluff
    From my experience with BMC air filters the only difference I have seen between the standard and race air filter is the actual opening for air to come in. There is usually a smaller hole for the standard one and the race one is wide open. For a bike with carbs it makes a noticable difference when installing larger main jets if you have the race filter (my BMC was a standard style that I cut to a race style to allow more air in). With a FI bike it will influence whatever mapping you do. From my understanding the standard style ones for the street have smaller air intake opening for emission reasons and to make them flow air as close to stock as possible. The removable cone or restrictor would be serving the same purpose as the smaller opening. This allows, in most cases a standard style (non race) aftermarket air filter to be installed in a bike without having to re-jet or re-map. Where as with a race version you would have to re-jet or re-map.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2009

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